Talking Knots

"We are pessimists…but we are ardent optimists"--Lenin

(Source: diananock, via untodeath)

topclassbitchfromthefuture:

reblogging everyones post and adding the caption “how is this news?”

(via hivvx)

megapaasaa:

we-are-star-stuff:

As we now know the Earth is round. Therefore, the challenge of any world map is to represent a round Earth on a flat surface. There are literally thousands of map projections and each has certain strengths and corresponding weaknesses, but the one you’re now picturing in your head most likely isn’t the area accurate representation.
The most widely used map today is the Mercator projection map. Mercator maps often appear in businesses, in libraries and in classrooms where geography is taught. This popularity is surprising, given the fact that the Mercator projection was first constructed in 1569. The more accurate representation of land mass is the Peters Projection Map:

Here’s a direct representation of the previously assumed factual map with the real flattened version:

The Peters Projection Map shows how Africa is larger than the combination of China, the US, Western Europe, India, Argentina, three Scandinavian countries and the British Isles. 
Mercator maps show Europe as being larger than South America. In reality, South America is almost twice the size of Europe. Alaska appears to be three times larger than Mexico, although Mexico actually is larger than Alaska. Greenland looks roughly the same size as Africa, when, in fact, Africa is fourteen times larger than Greenland. Africa also looks considerably smaller than Russia, even though Africa is actually 33% larger.
To see how big the western countries have become, it’s hard to see how this has nothing to do with suppression; to make us believe they are ‘bigger’ and ‘on top’. A simple change in the look of a map can cause a reconsideration of your fixed ideas about a place.
Bonus:
The world turned upside down.
Who says North is up?

This is important.

megapaasaa:

we-are-star-stuff:

As we now know the Earth is round. Therefore, the challenge of any world map is to represent a round Earth on a flat surface. There are literally thousands of map projections and each has certain strengths and corresponding weaknesses, but the one you’re now picturing in your head most likely isn’t the area accurate representation.

The most widely used map today is the Mercator projection map. Mercator maps often appear in businesses, in libraries and in classrooms where geography is taught. This popularity is surprising, given the fact that the Mercator projection was first constructed in 1569. The more accurate representation of land mass is the Peters Projection Map:

image

Here’s a direct representation of the previously assumed factual map with the real flattened version:

image

The Peters Projection Map shows how Africa is larger than the combination of China, the US, Western Europe, India, Argentina, three Scandinavian countries and the British Isles. 

Mercator maps show Europe as being larger than South America. In reality, South America is almost twice the size of Europe. Alaska appears to be three times larger than Mexico, although Mexico actually is larger than Alaska. Greenland looks roughly the same size as Africa, when, in fact, Africa is fourteen times larger than Greenland. Africa also looks considerably smaller than Russia, even though Africa is actually 33% larger.

To see how big the western countries have become, it’s hard to see how this has nothing to do with suppression; to make us believe they are ‘bigger’ and ‘on top’. A simple change in the look of a map can cause a reconsideration of your fixed ideas about a place.

Bonus:

This is important.

(via inkdefense)

Fusion-style portions

The international word for small

(Source: tepitome, via derkreisel)

Ministry pushing for increase in cigarette prices

dagwolf:

First of all, there’s a Korean Smokers’ Association. 

Second of all, they don’t want you to scapegoat the cigs.

jfc

Haha, I wonder how this group got started. There’s a pro smokers’ rights group in the uk called forest, and there are a lot of indications (coming from public health spheres) that it’s just a pr stunt discreetly funded by big tobacco firms as a way for the tobacco industry to have a semblance of public support for it’s anti-regulatory agenda

http://talkingknots.tumblr.com/post/97277023863/snfprtch-whoa-talkingknots-posted-a-harvey

snfprtch:

talkingknots:

snfprtch:

Whoa talkingknots posted a Harvey thing about accumulation by dispossession I didn’t even see that I’m so upset by objective chance rn

my thing is, in terms of the power wielded by financial capital at least, where else can most dividends come from. the same goes for…

I don’t disagree that financialization requires a new metric for considering the circulation of capital—indeed it forces us to consider circulation in a way more primary or foregrounded way than before—but I worry that treating it as analogous to primitive accumulation (which is how Harvey thinks broadly of accumulation by dispossession) puts us in a position to have to affirm an “outside” to global capital that still exists, which is where I draw a hard (and totalizing) line, ESPECIALLY since Harvey goes so far as to argue that the PRIMARY mode of capital accumulation and exploitation is accumulation by dispossession

my question is where the C in M-C-M reasserts itself in terms of finance capital and its circulation, since that C never just goes away; the (dialectical) point is that M-M-M, or M-M, is the form of appearance of finance, rather than its essential truth

Hmmm, no I think you’re right about Harvey’s accumulation-by-dispossession bias in terms of oversimplifying it, as well as the point about m-m-m being appearance and schein rather than what’s really going on

As for where the commodity reasserts itself, though, I’m also hmm. That’s a good point. I hate to drag out Harvey again, but if we consider the commodification and production and reproduction of space (which allows Harvey to put on his geographer hat), then we can see massive amounts of capital transformed into construction products, particularly in devalued areas of the city and even in previously unbuilt areas (This takes us to drilling exploration projects and pipelines in North Dakota/western canada) and outside the us to China’s brand new cities, which are more like construction for construction’s sake)

dagwolf:

anarcholiberalism:

goatcorporation:

al qaeda……. hacked


ISIS… hacked


Cookie… hacked

dagwolf:

anarcholiberalism:

goatcorporation:

al qaeda……. hacked

ISIS… hacked

Cookie… hacked

(Source: concepthuman)

snfprtch:

Whoa talkingknots posted a Harvey thing about accumulation by dispossession I didn’t even see that I’m so upset by objective chance rn

my thing is, in terms of the power wielded by financial capital at least, where else can most dividends come from. the same goes for interest on deposits, CDs, bonds, etc. what do banks actually produce that could enable the circulation of capital in a way that lets both the shareholders/depositors and the bank itself make money. obviously, nothing, they facilitate and grease the circulation of capital, normally by being vast wells of credit for capitalists whose money is already tied up in the circulation of commodity production.

sure there are financial “products” that can be sold or serviced, but these are fictitious capital and not real commodities (because, sure they are exchanged on the market, but their only use is further exchange, and furthermore they do not require actual labor power to be produced), according to more people than just marx. instead of real commodities, those things are more like rents (again, there is no value derived from rents of any kind—they are based on legal structures and conventional ownership, not socially-required labor time, the transformation of raw resources, etc., ie, the exploitation of labor power). or, too, they are the reorganization of already existing but not yet fully realized value (like mortgage debt), by the capitalists, into a new form (say, CDOs)

the outcome of a system like this is, it becomes best-practice to create as much debt as possible where you (the bank) own the debt and a shit ton of people owe the debt. and so, whatever happens at the point of production, at some point after that, rents (in divers forms) can siphon off large amounts of whatever ends up in the hands of labor

this is slightly ex tempore and probably needs refining

talkingknots:

"The predatory practices that were omnipresent before the crash in the housing market in general and within the sub-prime lending field in particular were legendary in their proportions. Before the main crisis broke, the low-income African American population of the United States was already estimated to have lost somewhere between $71 and $93 billion in asset values through predatory sub-prime practices. The dispossessions came in two waves—one mini-wave between the announcement of the Clinton initiative of 1995 and the collapse of Long Term Capital Management in 1998, and the other after 2001. Contemporaneously with the latter period, the bonuses on Wall Street and the earnings in the mortgage-initiating industry were soaring, with unheard-of profit rates from pure financial manipulations, particularly those associated with the securitization of high-cost but risky mortgages. The inference is that, by various hidden channels, massive transfers of wealth from the poor to the rich were occurring, beyond those since documented in the plainly shady and often illegal practices of mortgage companies like Countrywide, through financial manipulations in housing markets.

"What has happened since the crash is even more astonishing. Many of the foreclosures (over a million during 2010) turn out to have been illegal, if not downright fraudulent, leading a congressman from Florida to write to the Florida Supreme Court Justice that ‘if the reports I am hearing a re true, the illegal foreclosures taking place represent the largest seizure of private property ever attempted by banks and government entities.’ The attorney generals in all fifty states are now investigating the problem, but (as might be expected) most seem anxious to close out the investigations in as summary a way as possible at the price of a few financial settlements (but no restitutions of illegally seized properties). Certainly, no one is likely to go to jail for it, even though there is clear evidence of systematic forgery of legal documents."

—David Harvey, Rebel Cities: from the right to the city to the urban revolution, p. 54

I hate to self-reblog, but on the note of predatory practices in the banking sector….

But Wells Fargo, Bank of America, Chase Manhattan Bank, an JPMorgan Chase are not powerful because they worked hard. The best illustration of this point comes through a historical analysis. How did the banking system in this country get started? How did the richest people in the richest country in the world get their money?

Banking got started in this country by investing in the Triangular Slave Trade. The reason historians call it Triangular Slave Trade is that Europeans went to Africa, enslaved the people, brought them to this part of the world, and sold the people for products like hemp, sugarcane, cotton, and then those products were sent to Europe. That is why there were three angles: Africa, the United States, and Europe. The banking system—Lloyd’s of London, Barclays Bank, Bank of America, Wells Fargo-invested in that process and that is how their hegemony was established. In the last five years, almost all the banks I just mentioned have reluctantly acknowledged that they became established through the institution of slavery and the slave trade. So we see many people today questioning the system considering this simple fact: ‘Because the banks got rich by exploiting my ancestors I don’t see why I should have to pay them anything. They owe me if anything. I don’t want their money, because there is no price tag that can be placed on the suffering.’

Ahjamu Umi, from a guest lecture on March 21, 2013 at Concordia University

See also: “Wachovia apologizes for slavery ties,” CNN Money, June 5, 2005 & “American finance grew on the backs of slaves,” Chicago Sun-Times, March 7, 2014.

For more reading on the origins of the present American banking system and its foundations in the Euro-American slave trade, check out Slavery and American Economic Development (2006) by Gavin Wright and Debt, investment, slaves: credit relations in East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, 1825-1885 (1995) by Richard Kilbourne.

(via cerebralproxy)

now add to this the fact that:

while the median loss of household wealth in the United States for everyone was 28 percent over the period 2005-09, that of Hispanics was 66 percent, and that of blacks was 53 percent, while for whites it was 16 percent. The class character of ethnic discriminations in accumulation by dispossession, and the way these discriminations differentially affect neighborhood life, could not be plainer, particularly since most of the losses were due to falling housing values.

—David Harvey, Rebel Cities, 133.

and then, of course, outside of housing-value losses, the theft in home equity, from foreclosures, represents a HUGE transfer of wealth, once again, from predominantly black and Hispanic households to the banks—these same ones, Wells Fargo, BofA, Chase, etc.

(Source: paradelle, via blackourstory)

spacetwinks:

[oscillating fan turns my way] nice [oscillating fan moves past me] you’ve betrayed me for the last time

oh, so now you’ve come back

(via voidwish)

Gap ad on youtube just now was like “dress normal,” and ha


Peace to the children of the Earth ☭

Peace to the children of the Earth

(Source: thesovietbroadcast)

dogdongs:

The top comments on the Prince of Egypt opening scene
omfg I’m gonna cry this is beautiful

dogdongs:

The top comments on the Prince of Egypt opening scene

omfg I’m gonna cry this is beautiful

(via criticalforest)